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This is a list of bridges 1 through 100 (of 1,105 total) from the suspension bridge inventory for the country USA. Wherever you see a "Bridgemeister ID" number you can click it to isolate the bridge on its own page. Click here to go to the list of countries.
1801 (chain bridge)
Iron Bridge, Pennsylvania, USA (Jacob's Creek)
Bridgemeister ID:3
Structurae ID:0000873
O'Donnell ID:0
References:AAJ, ASB, BBR, BOB, BPL, CAB, DSE20000116, HBE, LAB, PTS2
Principals:Judge James Finley
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Suspended spans:3
Main span:70f
Deck width:12.5f
Notes
  • In an email dated January 16, 2000, Don Sayenga provided information about the location of this bridge. Generally attributed to Uniontown (the seat of Fayette County, PA), Mr. Sayenga offers some clues about the bridge's true location. "[James Finley] stated that he built it near the home of his friend Meason which implies a connection for the iron as Meason was making iron. Meason's home has survived by the way, a beautiful place. Finley stated it was a combination contract with the cost split between two counties, and he stated it was built over Jacob's Creek which is the county boundary. He also makes it clear it was on the road to Greensburg. The only place the old road crossed Jacob's Creek is just south of Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania. On the geodetic survey maps this spot is marked "Iron Bridge" but there is no town there. The last time I was there I saw a sign that said "Iron Bridge" on an automobile scrap yard. I found absolutely no trace of the bridge, but it was not very big, so there was no need for a huge abutment."
  • First suspension bridge with a rigid level deck.
1807 Chain
Georgetown, District of Columbia and Virginia, USA (Potomac River)
Bridgemeister ID:4
Structurae ID:0008052
Coordinates:N 38.92959 W 77.11627
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:AAJ, BBR, BCW, CAB, DSE20000118, HBE, PTS2
Principals:John Templeman
Use:Vehicular
Status:Destroyed, 1812
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:128.5f
Notes
  • BCW gives completion date of 1810 and says bridge was destroyed by flood two years later.
  • Coordinates given are for the current crossing (VA SR123, still known locally as "Chain Bridge Road") which is on (or very close) to the alignment of Chain Bridge. Chain Bridge was the third bridge at this site. The current structure is the eighth and was completed in 1940.
1807 Wills Creek
Cumberland, Maryland, USA (Wills Creek)
Bridgemeister ID:5
References:AAJ, BCW, CAB, DSE20000203, HBE
Principals:John Templeman
Status:Destroyed, 1810
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Main span:139f
Notes
1809 (chain bridge)
Brownsville vicinity, Pennsylvania, USA
Bridgemeister ID:8
References:AAJ, CAB, DSE20000203, HBE
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
1809 (chain bridge)
Brownsville, Pennsylvania, USA (Dunlap's Creek)
Bridgemeister ID:7
Structurae ID:0008055
References:AAJ, BCW, CAB, DSE20000118, DSE20000203, HBE
Principals:John Templeman
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Notes
  • From Dunlap's Creek Bridge: "The first recorded bridge across Dunlap's Creek was a wooden structure constructed prior to 1774. It was repaired in 1801, but was destroyed during a spring storm in 1808. A chain-link suspension bridge was built on the site in 1809; it collapsed under the weight of snow and a heavily laden wagon in 1820. A third bridge, another wooden structure, built in 1821 also failed. The present bridge is thus the fourth bridge at the site."
1809 (chain bridge)
Wilmington, Delaware, USA (Brandywine Creek)
Bridgemeister ID:6
References:AAJ, BCW, CAB, DSE20000203, HBE
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:145f
Deck width:30f
1809 Schuylkill Falls
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA (Schuylkill River)
Bridgemeister ID:9
Structurae ID:0008053
References:AAJ, BBR, BPL, CAB, DSE20000118, HBE, PTS2
Principals:John Templeman
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Suspended spans:2
Main spans:2 x 153f
Deck width:18f
Notes
  • Failed 1811, 1816. HBE notes the 1811 was due to weight of cattle. The 1816 failure was due to weight of ice and snow.
1810 (chain bridge)
Frankfort, Kentucky, USA (Kentucky River)
Bridgemeister ID:10
Structurae ID:0008057
References:AAJ, CAB
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Suspended spans:2
Main spans:2 x 167f
1810 (chain bridge)
Paulings Ford, Pennsylvania, USA (Schuylkill River)
Bridgemeister ID:11
Structurae ID:0008060
References:CAB
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
1810 (chain bridge)
Reading, Pennsylvania, USA (Schuykill River)
Bridgemeister ID:12
Structurae ID:0008059
References:CAB
Principals:Ulrich Kissinger
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
1810 (chain bridge)
Wrightstown, Pennsylvania, USA (Neshaminy River)
Bridgemeister ID:13
Structurae ID:0008058
References:AAJ, CAB, DSE20000403
Principals:John Parker
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Main spans:2 x 100f
1810 Chain (Essex-Merrimack)
Newburyport, Massachusetts, USA (Merrimack River - Deer Island)
Bridgemeister ID:14
Structurae ID:0001418
Coordinates:N 42.833167 W 70.90645
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:AAJ, BBR, CAB, GBD, HBE, POPE, PTS2, RDH
Principals:John Templeman
Use:Vehicular (two-lane light)
Status:Replaced
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:243f
Deck width:30f (2 roadways of 15f)
Notes
  • John Templeman built several bridges (like this one) using James Finley's design.
  • Repaired in 1827 after 5 of 10 chains snapped under weight of a team of oxen.
  • The complete description from Thomas Pope's 1811 Treatise (POPE):
    "The chain Bridge lately thrown over the Merrimack, three miles above Newburyport, in the state of Massachusetts, is now in constant use. This Bridge consists of a single arc, two hundred and forty-four feet span. The abutments are of stone, forty-seven feet long, and thirty-seven high; the uprights, or framed work, which stand on the abutments, are thirty-five feet high, over which are suspended ten distinct chains, the ends of which on both sides of the river are buried deep in pits and secured by large stones: each chain is five hundred and sixteen feet long; and, where they pass over the uprights, they are treble, and made in short links, which is said to be more secure than saddles made of plates of iron. The four middle joists rest on the chains; all the rest are suspended to the main chains to equalize the floor. This Bridge has two passage-ways of fifteen feet in width each, and the floor is so solid as to admit of horses, carriages, etc. to travel at any speed, with very little perceptible motion of the floors. The railing is stout and strong, which adds much firmness to the floor. There are three chains in each range on each side, and four in the middle range: they are calculated to support nearly five hundred tons. From the surface of the water to the middle of the floor is forty feet; and from the top of the abutments to the top of the uprights is thirty-five feet high, making seventy-two feet. The magnitude and power of the abutments, the width and length of the floors, the elevation of the work, the evident powers of the chains, etc. all conspire to make it a wonderful work. Every expense attending it did not amount to twenty-five thousand dollars. The abutment being of stone, the uprights covered, and the chains painted to prevent rust, leaves nothing but the flooring to decay. This Bridge was constructed by John Templeman, Esq. of the district of Columbia, whose talents for the productions of such work, and the various improvements suggested and used by him, have been highly beneficial, and do him great credit."
  • Gregory W. Buff sent a transcription of an article describing the 1827 failure. The article was in the Saturday, February 24, 1827 issue (Volume IV, Number 31) of the Canadian Spectator (Montreal, Quebec) newspaper:
    "Newburyport, Feb 9. Disastrious [sic] Accident. - On Tuesday morning last, the Essex Merrimack Bridge gave way in the centre, from the parting of the chains that support it. On the Bridge, at the moment, was a loaded team, drawn by six oxen and two horses, driven by two men, Messrs. Garlton [sic] and Jackman, all of whom were precipitated, forty feet, into the river beneath. The teamsters preserved themselves by means of swimming, and the support of fragments of the bridge; the team were all of them except one of the horses, swept beneath the ice a few rods below, and drowned. Five of the ten chains which supported the Bridge, were snapped in different places, and now remain upholding the broken and shattered timber altogether as sad a wreck as we ever witnessed. At the moment of the crash, the light evolved from the friction of the chains resembled the the vivid streaming of a meteor. Various excuses are assigned for the accident, and none, with more probability, than the united effect of the incumbent pressure of the immense body of snow lying upon the bridge, and the frost which had contracted the particles of iron. These produced a tenseness in the chains, which was incapable of resisting the additional pressure of the loaded team, and the whole gave way. The estimated expense of repairing the breach is about 4000 dollars; and the Directors, as we understand, plan to set about it immediately. It will be built up as before. To those who have been losers by this accident the corporation intend to make generous inumeration. The traveling will be uninterrupted, as the solidity of the ice above the bridge forms a safe passage way - and for the conveyance of carriages and heavy baggage the proprietors have promptly provided suitable boats. If any aversion to chain bridges has been produced by this accident, we should be sorry, for ourselves we feel yet unshaken faith in their superior security. The misfortune in this case was no doubt owing to the causes above stated, and not to any defect in the construction of the bridge. Probably hundreds of individuals, including each sex and all ages, have visited the ruins of the bridge. They present a sad and melancholy appearance - crushed and broken timbers suspended by the massy chains, which hang lazily from the pyramidical abutments, while the beholder instinctly shrinks back in terror at the reflection of the situation of the two human beings who were precipitated into the abyss beneath. The preservation of these two men is almost miraculous. Although hurled down 40 feet amid crashing and falling timber, entangled with their cattle, they fell without receiving the least injury, and attained the shore, after being for nearly half an hour, immerse in water chilled to the freezing point. Mr. Jackman is far advanced in years - and suffered somewhat from the exposure to the cold. Mr. Carlton [sic], escaped unhurt. The Chain Bridge has been built for about fifteen years, the span is 220 feet. We believe this was the second or third Chain Bridge built in the United States; and this is probably the first that has met with a similar accident. We understand the proprieters of the Rooks Bridge intend to rebuild theirs as a Chain Bridge."
  • Replaced by 1909 Chain - Newburyport, Massachusetts, USA. The 1909 structure was almost entirely new (except for portions of the piers and abutments).
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg Glass slide, collection of David Denenberg
1811 (chain bridge)
Juniata Crossing, Pennsylvania, USA (Juniata River)
Bridgemeister ID:15
Structurae ID:0008062
References:CAB, DSE20000403
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
1811 (chain bridge)
Kentucky, USA
Bridgemeister ID:16
References:CAB
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
1811 (chain bridge)
Kentucky, USA
Bridgemeister ID:17
References:CAB
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
1811 Third Street
Easton, Pennsylvania, USA (Lehigh River)
Bridgemeister ID:18
Structurae ID:0008063
References:CAB, DSE20000203
Principals:Jacob Blumer (?)
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
1814 Hamilton Street
Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA (Lehigh River)
Bridgemeister ID:19
References:AAJ, CAB, DSE20000203, PTS2
Principals:Jacob Blumer
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Suspended spans:4
Main spans:2
Side spans:2
1816 Spider
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA (Schuylkill River)
Bridgemeister ID:20
References:AAJ, BOB, BPL, GHD, HBE, LAB, PTS2
Principals:Josiah White, Erskine Hazard
Use:Footbridge
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Main span:393.75f
Notes
  • Narrow footbridge. First wire bridge in North America. HBE notes "first wire suspension bridge in any country."
  • Often described as having collapsed under the weight of ice and snow, Don Sayenga notes that no contemporary sources confirm this demise. Since the nearby chain bridge did fail under weight of ice and snow, he believes this fate has been misattributed to the White and Hazard footbridge. Don believes the bridge was just dismantled at some point after June, 1816.
  • Al Zagofsky also wrote to explain there was no evidence of this bridge collapsing under weight of ice and snow. Al writes: "According to an original source Captain Joshua Rowley Watson, who inspected the bridge on June 15, 1816: '...There was a bridge, but which by the weight of ice and snow, has been carried away.' This refers to the previous bridge that the cable bridge was temporarily replacing. I did not see any cause for failure of the wire rope bridge. My guess is that it was removed when the regular bridge was repaired. The same article shows a sketch that he made, showing the main span to be 407 feet. I am looking at the Canal History and Technology Proceedings Vol 5, March 22, 1986."
1820 Wills Creek
Cumberland, Maryland, USA (Wills Creek)
Bridgemeister ID:1149
References:CAB
Principals:Valentine Shockey
Status:Destroyed, 1838
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Main span:151.5f
Notes
1824 Biery's
Biery's Port (Catasauqua), Pennsylvania, USA (Lehigh River)
Bridgemeister ID:21
References:CAB, DSE20000203
Principals:Jacob Blumer, George Deily (?)
Status:Removed
Main cables:Chain (iron)
1824 Lehigh Gap (Palmerton)
Lehigh Gap, Pennsylvania, USA (Lehigh River)
Bridgemeister ID:22
Structurae ID:0008066
References:AAJ, CAB, DSE20000203, WHSB
Principals:Jacob Blumer
Use:Vehicular
Status:Replaced, 1933
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Suspended spans:3
Notes
  • Finley patent bridge.
1827 (chain bridge)
Newburyport, Massachusetts, USA (Merrimack River)
Bridgemeister ID:23
Structurae ID:0008067
References:AAJ, BPL, HBE, PTS2
Principals:Thomas Haven
Status:Replaced, 1840
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Suspended spans:5
Main spans:3
Side spans:2
Notes
  • Multi-span structure distinct from Templeman's 1810 Chain Bridge. Sometimes misidentified as an 1827 replacement to the 1810 Templeman Chain Bridge because of the significant damage to the Templeman bridge in 1827.
Print, collection of David Denenberg
1842 Fairmount (Callowhill St.)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA (Schuylkill River)
Bridgemeister ID:24
References:BBR, BOB, BPL, HBE, LAB, PTS2, WHSB
Principals:Charles Ellet
Use:Vehicular
Status:Replaced, 1875
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:342f
Notes
  • BBR and BOB say 1841.
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1843 (suspension bridge)
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA (Miami Canal)
Bridgemeister ID:25
References:BOB
Status:Removed
Suspended spans:3
1845 Pittsburgh Aqueduct
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA (Allegheny River)
Bridgemeister ID:27
Structurae ID:0006118
References:BOB, BOP, BPL, HBE, ONF, PTS2, RDH, SJR
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Aqueduct
Status:Removed, 1861
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:7
Main spans:7 x 162f
Notes
  • In use until 1860.
1846 Monongahela (Smithfield Street)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA (Monongahela River)
Bridgemeister ID:28
Structurae ID:0007338
References:BOB, BOP, BPL, HBE, ONF, PBR, PTS2
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed, 1882
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:8
Main spans:8 x 188f
Deck width:20f
1848 Delaware Aqueduct (Roebling Aqueduct)
Lackawaxen, Pennsylvania and Minisink Ford, New York, USA (Delaware River)
Bridgemeister ID:30
Structurae ID:0000260
O'Donnell ID:21
Coordinates:N 41.48262 W 74.98461
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:AAJ, BDR, BOB, BPL, GBD, LAB, LACE, RDH, SJR
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Aqueduct and Vehicular (one-lane, with walkway)
Status:In use (last checked, 2006)
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:4
Main spans:3 x 131f, 142f
Notes
Photo by David Denenberg Photo by Andy Warren Photo courtesy National Park Service Photo by Patrick S. O'Donnell
1848 Niagara Suspension
Niagara Falls, New York, USA and Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada (Niagara River)
Bridgemeister ID:29
References:BOB, BPL, HBE, ONF, PTS2
Principals:Charles Ellet
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:770f
Deck width:7.5f

Notes
1849 Lackawaxen Aqueduct
Lackawaxen, Pennsylvania, USA (Lackawaxen River)
Bridgemeister ID:31
Structurae ID:0007339
References:AAJ, BOB, BPL, RDH, SJR
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Aqueduct
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:2
Main spans:2 x 114.37f
Notes
1849 Wheeling (Wheeling and Belmont)
Wheeling, West Virginia, USA (Ohio River)
Bridgemeister ID:32
Structurae ID:0000478
O'Donnell ID:382
Coordinates:N 40.07167 W 80.72667
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:AAJ, BBR, BC3, BOB, BPL, CEJ, COB, GBD, HBE, LAB, LACE, ONF, PTS2, RWS, WCC, WHSB
Principals:Charles Ellet
Use:Vehicular (two-lane light)
Status:In use (last checked, 2011)
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:1,010f
Notes
  • Rebuilt, 1854 after it was wrecked by a windstorm. Contrary to popular myth, the rebuilding was undertaken by Ellet and his assistant William K. McComas, not by John A. Roebling.
  • Overhauled, 1860. Again, popular myth often attributes this work to the Roeblings. WHSB attributes this work to William K. McComas. After this overhaul, the bridge still does not have the distinctive diagonal cable stays that give it the appearance of a Roebling bridge.
  • Overhauled, 1872, according to a design by Washington Roebling. John A. Roebling had died in 1869 and was not involved with this work. WHSB notes, "The design essentially Roeblingized the bridge with the diagonal cable stays that are such a prominent feature of the bridge."
  • Was still part of Virginia at time of completion.
  • Became longest suspension bridge by eclipsing 1834 Zaehringen - Fribourg, Switzerland.
  • Eclipsed by new longest suspension bridge 1851 Lewiston-Queenston - Lewiston, New York, USA and Queenston, Ontario, Canada.
Photo by David Denenberg Photo by Wayne Grodkiewicz Photo by Stuart Brorson Photo by Scott Bumgardner Photo by Patrick S. O'Donnell Photo by David Denenberg Collection of Doug Lehman
1850 (suspension bridge)
Nashville and Edgefield, Tennessee, USA (Cumberland River)
Bridgemeister ID:33
Structurae ID:0007340
References:AAJ
Principals:Adolphus Heiman, Mathew Dickinson Field
Use:Vehicular
Status:Destroyed, 1862
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Main span:538f
Notes
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1851 High Falls Aqueduct
High Falls, New York, USA (Roundout Creek)
Bridgemeister ID:34
Structurae ID:0007341
References:AAJ, BOB, BPL, RDH, SJR
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Aqueduct
Status:Removed, August, 1921
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:145f
Notes
1851 Lewiston-Queenston
Lewiston, New York, USA and Queenston, Ontario, Canada (Niagara River)
Bridgemeister ID:35
Structurae ID:0007333
References:AAJ, BOB, BPL, HBE, PTS2
Principals:Edward Serrell
Use:Vehicular
Status:Wrecked, 1864
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:1,043f
Deck width:21f (AAJ: 19.5f)
Notes
  • Wrecked by wind February 1, 1864. Stay cables beneath the bridge had been disconnected to avoid damage from rising ice. Portions of the cables and deck remained, in a derelict state, as late as 1895. Replacement was not started until the late 1890's.
  • The February 3, 1864 edition of Niagara Falls Gazette describes the wind event: "Partial Destruction Of The Lewiston Suspension Bridge -- A portion of the flooring and other wood-work of the Lewiston Suspension Bridge was blown down during the gale Monday forenoon. It seems that the long guys had been cut during the late ice jam to prevent injury to the structure and thus its strength to withstand a gale was much weakened. The wind swept through the gorge on Monday with terrific force and swayed the bridge so that some of the cross timbers, near the centre were loosened from their fastenings, and fell, of course carrying the floor with them. A large portion at each end, remains without material injury. The extent of the damage -- financially -- we have not yet learned, but we judge from what we hear that it may be about $10,000. The bridge was built in 1852 and cost not far from $40,000. It will doubtless soon be repaired and in use."
  • Became longest suspension bridge by eclipsing 1849 Wheeling (Wheeling and Belmont) - Wheeling, West Virginia, USA. However, Don Sayenga notes the length of the suspended span of this bridge was only 849 feet, not 1,043 as often cited. Don writes: "[1,043 feet] was the distance between the towers built high up on the cliffs above the crossing - because there was no space for them below. The roadway suspended from the towers was only 849 feet span over the water from abutment to abutment." Thus, Roebling's Cincinnati bridge should be considered the first to eclipse Wheeling's record main span.
  • Eclipsed by new longest suspension bridge 1867 John A. Roebling (Cincinnati, Cincinnati and Covington) - Cincinnati, Ohio and Covington, Kentucky, USA.
  • Later at same location 1899 Lewiston-Queenston - Lewiston, New York, USA and Queenston, Ontario, Canada.
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1851 Neversink Aqueduct
Cuddebackville, New York, USA (Neversink River)
Bridgemeister ID:36
Structurae ID:0007334
References:AAJ, BOB, RDH, SJR
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Aqueduct
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:170f
Notes
1852 (suspension bridge)
Frankfort, Kentucky, USA (Kentucky River)
Bridgemeister ID:1714
References:AAJ, ENG18570605, HBE, HOF
Principals:Mathew Dickinson Field
Use:Rail
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:2
Main spans:~200f, ~300f
Notes
  • HOF describes the location as "between the foot of Broadway and the neck of land near the mouth of Benson Creek."
  • According to ENG18570605, the bridge was significantly reconstructed (because of excessive vibrations) by Julius W. Adams to have three spans of 120, 163, and 163 feet.
1852 Charleston (Lovell Street)
Charleston, West Virginia, USA (Elk River)
Bridgemeister ID:38
References:AAJ, EOV, HBE, PTS2
Principals:W. O. Buchanan, William Kuhn, Abraham Wright
Use:Vehicular
Status:Collapsed, December 15, 1904
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:478f
Deck width:17f
Notes
  • Was still part of Virginia at time of completion.
  • Damaged during Civil War. An article in the August 2, 1861 issue of the New York Times mentions: "A junction of our forces having now been effected, the army at once moved on to Elk River, which debouches into the Kanawha at Charleston, where the army encamped for the night. We would have crossed the stream at once, and marched through the town the same evening, but for the fact that the rebels had partially destroyed the beautiful suspension bridge which spans Elk River at this spot, rendering it unsafe for passage. Not content with burning a portion of the flooring, they nearly severed the strands which support the structure, and aid their work, too, in the most bungling manner. A more shameless piece of vandalism I never witnessed. While the army slept, a company of sappers and miners repaired the damage, and yesterday the army, nearly five thousand strong, marched through the streets of Charleston."
  • Next to 1884 (suspension bridge) - Charleston, West Virginia, USA.
Print, collection of David Denenberg
1852 Fairmont and Palatine
Fairmont, West Virginia, USA (Monongahela River)
Bridgemeister ID:39
References:EOV, PTS2
Principals:James L. Randolph
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Notes
  • Was still part of Virginia at time of completion.
1852 Guyandotte
Guyandotte and Huntington, West Virginia, USA (Guyandotte River)
Bridgemeister ID:40
References:AAJ, EOV, PTS2
Principals:George Wilson Mason
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:450f
Notes
  • EOV cites a source claiming the bridge was begun in 1853, but not completed until 1858. AAJ says completed in 1848
  • Was still part of Virginia at time of completion.
Postcard, collection of David Denenberg
1852 Huse
Yeomet, California, USA (Cosumnes River)
Bridgemeister ID:1088
Coordinates:N 38.55323 W 120.84755
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
Principals:E.P. Bowman
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Notes
  • Yeomet was located near the present day California Route 49 crossing of the Cosumnes River by the confluence of the North Fork and Middle Fork of the Cosumnes River. Yeomet was once known as "Forks of the Cosumnes." The location coordinates provided here are only to show the approximate location of the confluence and should not be considered the exact location of the bridge. This inventory entry represents the suspension bridge for which a photograph exists in the Lawrence & Houseworth collection titled "Suspension Bridge over the Cosumnes River, At Yeomet, El Dorado County". This image exists in several online archives. The clearest image I have found exists in the California Pioneers archive. Reviewing all of the information bites available for 1850's suspension bridges over the Cosumnes River, there were likely more than one suspension bridge.
  • Barry Parr, consulting Erwin Guddeís California Gold Camps (University of California Press), writes that Gudde notes the bridge is located "at Yeomet and says it was marked on the County Map in 1866, and was owned by S.E. Huse for a decade. Of Yeomet, Gudde writes: 'Amador County. At the junction of the forks of Cosumnes River, formerly in El Dorado County'. Gudde says the camp developed in 1849 or 1850 and prospered for a number of years, but says nothing further about the bridge." Barry also notes that some sources cite Yeomet as located in Calaveras County, but this is because Amador County was created in 1854 from Calaveras County. Barry continues: "The California Division of Mines Bulletin 141, Geological Guidebook along Highway 49, mentions the Highway 49 bridge across the Cosumnes as also known as the Huse Bridge."
  • The October 14, 1976 edition of The Mountain Democrat Times (Placerville, California) has an article about the Huse Bridge (from the Heritage Association of El Dorado) describing Huse's Bridge:
    "E.P. Bowman, an early motel keeper in Yeomet had a ferry across the Cosumnes and by 1852 had built a bridge there (J.M. Watrous had a ferry there also). Traffic was heavy and... [the tolls were] as much a 'gold mine' as most of the nearby river claims which ran for miles above and below the town. (Yeomet falls was below the bridge). The famous Mother Lode crossed the river in the vicinity of the town. Samuel Huse bought the bridge at Yeomet in about 1862 and owned it until his death. His widow Laura sold the wire suspension bridge and the exclusive right to collect tolls to John Ballard and W.H. Martin in 1883. William Miller purchased the property in 1887."
    It is unclear if the 1852 E.P. Bowman bridge was the same structure as the suspension bridge purchased by Huse ten years later, but I have assumed so pending additional information.
  • An obituary for in the August 28, 1949 edition of the Oakland Tribune for Lilian Williams presents a stronger tie between E.P. Bowman and S.E. Huse: "With her foster parents, the E. P. Bowmans, Mrs. Williams spent her childhood in Oakland, San Francisco and Yeomet, between Plymouth and Placerville. Bowman and her foster uncle, S.E. Huse, owned a hotel at Yeomet. They also built and operated a toll bridge there on the Cosumnes River, over which most of the heavy machinery and mining equipment was transported to the old Mother Lode mines."
  • See 1852 Wilson's - Cosumne, California, USA.
  • See Lamb's - Latrobe vicinity and Plymouth vicinity, California, USA.
1852 Wilson's
Cosumne, California, USA (Cosumnes River)
Bridgemeister ID:2116
Coordinates:N 38.49229 W 121.17183
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:DSL200106
Principals:W. D. Wilson
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire
Main span:150f
Deck width:12f
Notes
  • The location of this bridge was near the present day location of Cosumne in Sacramento County, just east of Sloughhouse. The location coordinates provided here are only to show the approximate location of present-day Cosumne and should not be considered the exact location of the bridge. Don Sayenga writes: "The exact location was at the intersection of [present-day] Dillard Road and State Route 16 a very short distance east of Sloughhouse, Sacramento County, California... The whole area at that time was known as Daylor's Ranch."
  • Don Sayenga notes an F.W. Panhorst (of the California Highway Department) citation:
    "Alta California July 27, 1852 reprinting an article from Sacramento Union mentions a wire suspension bridge built in Sacramento County across the Cosumnes. The span is described as 150 feet with a roadway width of 12 feet. One W.D. Wilson is mentioned as owner and designer. This structure, according to our best information, was the first suspension bridge in California."
  • A January 14, 1862 Sacramento Bee article notes:
    "The quartz mill and house of the brothers Wiley, just beyond Butte City, were carried away by the torrent. At Ione City, Williamís brick stable had fallen, and several other houses had met with a like fate. On Sutter creek, the loss and damage had been terrific - bridges and houses being carried off like chaff. Mr. Haywood, proprietor of a quartz mill on Sutter creek, had been a loser to the amount of at least $75,000. We have it from good authority that in the counties of Calaveras and Amador not a bridge is left standing. Below Ione City, it is thought that there has been loss of life."

    "Last Saturday night, the reports of minute guns were heard, as if signals of distress, coming from the direction of a house where lived Mr. Martin and his family. The whole of Ione Valley was many feet under water. No boats were to be had, so that assistance might be rendered those in danger and distress. In a short time a heavy crash was heard, the signals of distress ceased, and our informant tells us that when he left the general impression was that Martin and his family had lost their lives. The wire suspension bridge over the Cosumnes river had disappeared - the house known as Wilsonís Exchange has also been washed away, and Daylorís adobe house is flat with the ground. These facts go to show that throughout the mountain districts, as well as in the valleys, the destruction of property and loss of human life exceed the worst that was anticipated, and we shall hear repetitions of such tales of distress as the avenues for communication are gradually opened to us."
    which seems to imply a relationship between the Ione Valley, the Cosumnes River, and the bridge at Wilson's Exchange, but this may have just been coincidental that both "Ione Valley" and Wilson's Exchange were mentioned in the same paragraph; they are nearby. Present-day Ione is in Amador County a few miles east of Sacramento County. The Cosumnes River forms the northern border of Amador County several miles to the north of present-day Ione. Barry Parr notes that the Cosumnes River does not flow through the "Ione Valley," but Barry writes: "Recalling Daylorís name in Historic Spots of California: 'Daylor established himself as a trader and hotel-keeper on the Cosumnes River about a mile east of Slough House. This place, which was at first known as Daylorís Ranch, later became the Cosumnes post office.' (p. 290) The site of Cosumnes post office is about five miles downstream from Bridge House, and both are on the Sacramento-Ione Road.
  • An Illustrated History of Sacramento County, California. (by Hon. Win. J. Davis, Lewis Publishing Company, 1890, Pages 435-436) sheds more light on W.D. Wilson. See Debbie Walke Gramlick's transcription:
    "Mr. Wilson and part of the company concluded to seek the land of gold, while others kept to the original design of going to Oregon. On his arrival Mr. Wilson mined for a short time on Mormon Island and then moved to Hangtown, now Placerville, where in the winter of 1848-49 he built the first house erected in that place. The family then comprised six children; five more were born in California; nine grew to maturity and seven are living in 1889. In the spring of 1850 he moved down on the Cosumnes and purchased 6,000 acres of the Hartnell Grant, and built a tavern, long known as Wilsonís Exchange, across the river from what is now the Cosumnes post office. He was postmaster from the establishment of that office until 1868. He was by trade a millwright and built the first suspension bridge on the Cosumnes."
  • See 1852 Huse - Yeomet, California, USA.
  • See Lamb's - Latrobe vicinity and Plymouth vicinity, California, USA.
1853 (suspension bridge)
Delaware, Ohio, USA (Olentangy River - Winter Street)
Bridgemeister ID:774
References:SME20030311
Principals:John Gray
Use:Footbridge
Status:Destroyed, February 1883
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Notes
  • SME20030311: Intended only for foot traffic, destroyed by ice jam February 1883.
1853 (suspension bridge)
Falmouth, Kentucky, USA (Licking River)
Bridgemeister ID:42
References:AAJ, EOV
Principals:D. Griffith Smith
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Main span:323f
1853 Dresden
Dresden, Ohio, USA (Muskingum River)
Bridgemeister ID:43
Structurae ID:0000947
References:EOV, GBD, OCEN198202
Principals:George Copland
Use:Vehicular
Status:Destroyed, 1913
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Notes
Postcard, collection of David Denenberg
1853 Fort Hunter (Fonda)
Tribes Hill, New York, USA (Mohawk River)
Bridgemeister ID:44
References:ONC, PTS2
Principals:John W. Murphy
Status:Dismantled, 1935
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Main span:556f
Notes
  • Amsterdam/Fort Hunter vicinity, Montgomery County, NY. Dismantled 1935 (ONC).
Postcard, collection of David Denenberg
1853 Mill Pond
Kingfield, Maine, USA (Carrabasset River)
Bridgemeister ID:45
References:AAJ, BPL
Principals:Daniel Beedy
Use:Vehicular (one-lane, with walkway)
Status:Replaced, 1916
Main cables:Chain (iron)
Main span:190f
Deck width:15f

Notes
Photograph, collection of David Denenberg Photograph, collection of David Denenberg
1853 O'Byrne's
Copperopolis vicinity, California, USA (Stanislaus River)
Bridgemeister ID:2324
Use:Vehicular
Status:Destroyed, 1862
Notes
  • Different accounts describe this as a chain and wire suspension bridge. Collapsed November, 1853 under weight of oxen team. Rebuilt, but destroyed by flood, 1862. Replaced by a multi-span covered bridge.
  • Name "O'Byrne's" appears to have originated with a "Patrick O. Byrne" who operated a ferry at this location prior to construction of the suspension bridge. After time, it became known as O'Byrne's Ferry.
1853 Tiffin
Tiffin, Ohio, USA (Sandusky River)
Bridgemeister ID:46
References:EOV
Principals:John Gray
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
1854 Elk River
Sutton, West Virginia, USA (Elk River)
Bridgemeister ID:554
References:EOV
Principals:Ira Hart
Use:Vehicular (with walkway)
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Main span:460f
1854 Licking River I
Covington and Newport, Kentucky, USA (Licking River)
Bridgemeister ID:47
References:BOB, BPL, EOV
Principals:John Gray, George C. Tarvin
Status:Collapsed, 1854
Notes
  • BPL: Collapsed under weight of cattle 1853. BOB: Indicates year of completion and collapse as 1854. EOV: Appears more authoritative on the matter, "Although the bridge was not quite finished, Tarvin and the mayor of Covington rode the first vehicle across it on December 28, 1853. Less than two weeks later... the bridge collapsed."
  • The January 18, 1854 edition of The New York Times has a small article with a January 16, 1854 byline reporting the collapse of the bridge: "The... bridge... gave way this evening, while two men and eighteen cattle were crossing it... The keys which held the wire cable to the anchors gave way."
  • Replaced by 1854 Licking River II - Covington and Newport, Kentucky, USA.
1854 Licking River II
Covington and Newport, Kentucky, USA (Licking River)
Bridgemeister ID:48
References:EOV
Principals:John Gray
Status:Removed

Notes
1854 Morgantown
Morgantown, West Virginia, USA (Monongahela River)
Bridgemeister ID:49
References:AAJ, EN19070918, EOV, HBE, PTS2
Use:Vehicular (with walkway)
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:608f
Deck width:20f
Notes
  • Was still part of Virginia at time of completion.
Postcard, collection of David Denenberg
1855 Minneapolis (St. Anthony's Falls)
Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA (Mississippi River - Nicollet Island)
Bridgemeister ID:50
References:AAJ, BPL, HBE, PTS2
Principals:Thomas M. Griffith
Use:Vehicular
Status:Demolished, 1876
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:620f
Deck width:17f

Notes
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1855 Niagara Suspension
Niagara Falls, New York, USA and Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada (Niagara River)
Bridgemeister ID:51
Structurae ID:0000047
References:AAJ, BAAW, BBR, BFL, BMA, BOB, BPL, HBE, LIR, NSB, ONF, PTS2, SA18810716, SJR
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Rail and Vehicular (double-deck, heavy rail, with walkway)
Status:Replaced, 1897
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:821.3f
Notes
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1855 Shohola (Barryville-Shohola, Shohola-Barryville)
Barryville, New York and Shohola, Pennsylvania, USA (Delaware River)
Bridgemeister ID:41
References:BDR, SHO
Principals:Chauncy Thomas, John A. Roebling
Use:Vehicular
Status:Dismantled, 1941
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Notes
  • BDR: Built 1856, severely damaged 1859, rebuilt, collapsed Jan. 1st 1865, rebuilt 1866. Dale writes: "A respected historian, John Willard Johnston, who knew Chauncey Thomas personally and visited the area during his ownership of the toll bridge, insisted that Thomas, as the builder, was grossly incompetent."
  • Originally constructed with one main span, the center pier was added during the 1866 reconstruction.
  • Don Sayenga's research leads him to conclude the bridge was completed in the fall of 1855. He notes an article from the Pike County Democrat (June 21, 1872) stating the bridge was completed in 1855. The article also notes the 1859 collapse occurred on July 2, 1859. Don's interest in this bridge is piqued by the connection to John Roebling, "...this bridge seems to be the only John Roebling bridge that failed in service..." Roebling prepared plans, for the original bridge, for Chauncy Thomas (who, by Dale's account was inexperienced).
Postcard, collection of David Denenberg Postcard, collection of David Denenberg
1856 Bidwell Bar
Oroville, California, USA (Feather River)
Bridgemeister ID:52
Structurae ID:0024776
O'Donnell ID:425
Coordinates:N 39.537483 W 121.45415
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:BPL, DSL200106, LACE
Principals:Bidwell Bridge Co.
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:In use, but restricted to foot traffic (last checked, 2005)
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:~220f
Notes
  • Dismantled before completion of Oroville Dam and replaced by the 1965 high-level Bidwell Bar suspension bridge. The 1856 structure was later reassembled about 1.5 miles south of the new Bidwell Bar bridge. Coordinates provided here are for the current location of the bridge at Kelly Ridge.
  • Replaced by 1965 Bidwell Bar - Oroville, California, USA.
Photo by David Denenberg Photo by Patrick S. O'Donnell
1856 Bridge of Sighs
Carthage and Rochester, New York, USA (Genesee River)
Bridgemeister ID:54
Principals:Josiah Bissell, Jr.
Status:Collapsed, 1857
Main cables:Wire
Notes
1856 Strong
Strong, Maine, USA (Sandy River)
Bridgemeister ID:53
References:BPL
Principals:Daniel Beedy
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:254f
Deck width:13f

Notes
Postcard, collection of David Denenberg
1856 Westmoreland's
Lancha Plana, California, USA (Mokelumne River)
Bridgemeister ID:1089
References:DSL200106
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
1857 Black River (Bradford, Mill Street)
Watertown, New York, USA (Black River)
Bridgemeister ID:55
References:HBE, ONC
Principals:Gilbert Bradford
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed, 1890's
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:53m
Deck width:18f
Notes
  • Replaced in 1890's (ONC).
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1857 Change (Chain, Lehigh Canal Swinging, Wire Towing Path at Pool No. 8)
Glendon, Pennsylvania, USA (Lehigh River)
Bridgemeister ID:56
O'Donnell ID:554
Coordinates:N 40.65382 W 75.24774
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:HAERPA461, HBP
Principals:Lehigh Coal and Navigation Co., E.A. Douglas
Use:Footbridge and Change
Status:Derelict (last checked, 2007)
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:2
Main spans:2
Notes
  • Often mistakenly called a "chain" bridge, this is a "change" bridge. Dale Oswald explains (in the context of the Aldrich Change Bridge at Palmyra, NY), "A change bridge is one with low railings and an underpass that allowed draft teams to move from one side of the canal to the other without unhitching, cloverleaf-style."
Photo by David Denenberg
1858 Portsmouth
Portsmouth, Ohio, USA (Scioto River)
Bridgemeister ID:57
References:EOV
Principals:E.B. Gray
Status:Collapsed, 1859

Notes
1859 General Dean (Carlyle)
Carlyle, Illinois, USA (Kaskaskia River)
Bridgemeister ID:58
Structurae ID:0001383
O'Donnell ID:365
Coordinates:N 38.61083 W 89.35671
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:BPL, GBD
Principals:D. Griffith Smith
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:In use, but restricted to foot traffic (last checked, 2005)
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Main span:264f
Notes
  • Rebuilt 1920s, 1970s. Restored, 1950's, for use as a footbridge.
  • Bypassed, 1924.
Photograph, collection of David Denenberg Photo by David Denenberg Photo by Patrick S. O'Donnell Photograph, collection of David Denenberg
1860 Allegheny River (Sixth Street)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA (Allegheny River)
Bridgemeister ID:59
Structurae ID:0007343
References:BOB, BOP, BPL, HBE, PBR, PTS2, SJR
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Vehicular (with walkway)
Status:Replaced, 1892
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:4
Main spans:2 x 344f
Side spans:2 x 171f
Deck width:40f
Notes
  • BPL cites this bridge as the first suspension bridge with metal towers. However, at least two earlier suspension bridges (1857 Watertown, New York and 1856 Bidwell Bar, California) are known to have metal towers and even Roebling's 1846 Smithfield Street Bridge in Pittsburgh had cast iron towers.
  • Next to 1884 North Side (Seventh Street) - Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1860 Auburn-Coloma
Auburn and Coloma, California, USA (North Fork American River)
Bridgemeister ID:274
References:PTS2
Principals:John Mollett
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Notes
Postcard, courtesy of Kevin Walsh
1860 Port Gibson
Grindstone Ford, Port Gibson vicinity, Mississippi, USA (Bayou Pierre)
Bridgemeister ID:1659
References:PTS2
Status:Removed, circa 1920's
Notes
  • Partially burned by retreating Confederate troops May 2nd, 1863 during the Vicksburg Campaign of the Civil War. Union troops extinquished the fire and quickly repaired the bridge.
  • Demolished, circa 1920's. Descriptions for the Vicksburg Campaign imply there may have been another suspension bridge in the Port Gibson area.
1861 (suspension bridge)
Connellsville and New Haven, Pennsylvania, USA (Youghiogheny River)
Bridgemeister ID:278
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire
Suspended spans:1
Postcard, collection of David Denenberg
1861 Gauley River
Gauley Bridge, West Virginia, USA (Gauley River)
Bridgemeister ID:2123
References:AAJ
Principals:John W. Murphy
Use:Vehicular
Status:Destroyed, 1862
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Notes
  • Don Sayenga writes:
    "It was built in great haste out of military necessity utilizing abutments and piers of an earlier wooden bridge that had been burnt by a unit of the Confederate Army commanded by Gen. John B. Floyd. This occurred just after the fight known as the Battle of Carnifex Ferry on September 10, 1861. Later the Confederate Army recaptured the bridge location and burnt the new one also. The designer/builder was John W. Murphy (1828-1874) who was working as an engineer in Alabama when the war began in 1861. He held a Civil Engineer degree from Rensselaer. Murphy's concept involved multiple factory-made wire ropes as main cables combined with wooden bracing. The exact location of the bridge seems to have been called the New River Cliffs but I haven't found this on a map. Photos of the bridge came into the possession of Prof. George Plympton, an associate of Murphy's in the latter part of his career. Plympton presented a paper about bridges in 1894 reported by The Railroad Gazette August 24. The photos were given to the Gazette - one of their artists converted the photos to pen-and-ink drawings for publication in the issue of November 9, 1894, p. 773."
    Don transcribed the following:

    The Railroad Gazette, August 24, 1894, Page 579.
    "Prof. Plympton then related two reminiscences of bridge building between 1852 and 1861...The other instance was the building of a military suspension bridge over the Gauley River in 1861. The government called for a bridge of sufficient strength to permit the passage of General Rosecrans corps, allowing twenty-four days' time. The abutments and piers of the former bridge remained in good condition. Murphy submitted an original plan, which was accepted. The plans were drawn up by Mr. Murphy on the cars, while he was traveling to Washington to submit his ideas to the United States army en gineers. The plans were accepted and Murphy at once went to work. Four one-inch wire ropes, laid side by side, formed his cables. A pyramidal tower was constructed of heavy timbers, and in place of suspending rods a loosely-formed truss was hung upon the cable without fastening. This truss, connected with the floor of the bridge, was finished on the 22nd day after receiving the order to build."
    Proceedings of the Franklin Institute, October 21, 1874, Page 306.
    "It was a suspension bridge 520 feet in length, 10 feet roadway, consisting of three spans, supported by eight cables. There was some doubt in the mind of the commanding officer that it would answer the purpose...To test it ...he asked that a battalion be ordered to make a charge over it, which was done, to the satisfaction of the General in command...it afterwards passed and repassed the whole command as long as they occupied that portion of the country. A change of base put it into the possession of the Confederates who burnt it down."
  • An article in the July 15, 1951 edition of The Charleston Daily Mail describes the bridge and its demise:
    "After the Confederate forces had retreated and burned the old covered bridge, the Federal engineers constructed a make-shift bridge across the Gauley. There are pictures in existence showing this light, cable bridge erected on the old piers of the original bridge. This structure was cut down Sept. 11, 1862, when the Federals retreated from an attack by Confederate Gen. W. W. Loring, who routed the Unionists from the valley for a brief time."
  • Jakkula has an 1862 entry for "Gauley River Bridge" with little information, citing the American Railroad Journal, Vol. 37, No. 1472, July 2, 1864, p.651: "A suspension bridge built over the Gauley River, Virginia, by the Government in 1862." It is unclear if this reference is for the same bridge.
1861 Portsmouth
Portsmouth, Ohio, USA (Scioto River)
Bridgemeister ID:61
References:EOV
Principals:Max J. Becker
Status:Removed
Notes
1861 Weitchpec
Weitchpec, California, USA (Klamath River)
Bridgemeister ID:1090
References:DSL200106
Principals:Andrew S. Hallidie
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1

Notes
1862 (suspension bridge)
California, USA (Trinity River)
Bridgemeister ID:1093
References:DSL200106
Principals:Andrew S. Hallidie
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
1862 (suspension bridge)
California, USA (Stanislaus River)
Bridgemeister ID:1094
References:DSL200106
Principals:Andrew S. Hallidie
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
1862 (suspension bridge)
California, USA (Tuolumne River)
Bridgemeister ID:1095
References:DSL200106
Principals:Andrew S. Hallidie
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire
1862 (suspension bridge)
McCourtney's Crossing, California, USA (Bear River)
Bridgemeister ID:1092
References:DSL200106
Principals:Andrew S. Hallidie
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
1862 Pine Street
Nevada City, California, USA (Deer Creek)
Bridgemeister ID:62
References:DSL200106
Principals:Andrew S. Hallidie
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Photo courtesy Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division
1862 Rattlesnake Bar
Folsom vicinity, California, USA (American River - Rattlesnake Bar)
Bridgemeister ID:1091
References:DSL200106
Principals:Andrew S. Hallidie
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:Inundated
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Notes
  • I believe the location of Rattlesnake Bar is closer to present-day Auburn than Folsom, near the location of Goose Flat marked on modern topographical maps of the region.
  • Inundated during creation of Folsom Lake.
  • Rodi Lee writes: "[The bridge] collapsed in 1954 when an overweight truck filled with manure crossed it. The driver was unhurt. There are newspaper articles about the incident (Auburn Journal, Auburn). There are some photos in the article as well. The bridge abutments show when the the lake water is low. The bridge was upstream of Wild Goose Flats."
Photo courtesy Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Photo by Jerry Van Lengen
1865 Market Street
Williamsport, Pennsylvania, USA (Susquehanna River)
Bridgemeister ID:64
References:AAJ, JFI186604
Principals:Alfred P. Boller
Use:Vehicular
Status:Destroyed, June 1, 1889
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:5
Main spans:5 x 200f
Notes
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1866 (suspension bridge)
Nashville and Edgefield, Tennessee, USA (Cumberland River)
Bridgemeister ID:1965
References:AAJ
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed, 1884
Main cables:Wire

Notes
1867 John A. Roebling (Cincinnati, Cincinnati and Covington)
Cincinnati, Ohio and Covington, Kentucky, USA (Ohio River)
Bridgemeister ID:65
Structurae ID:0000513
O'Donnell ID:1000
Coordinates:N 39.09167 W 84.50833
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:BAAW, BC3, BOB, BPL, COB, EOV, HBE, LAB, LACE, ONF, PTS2, SJR, TOB
Principals:John A. Roebling
Use:Vehicular (two-lane heavy, with walkway)
Status:In use (last checked, 2013)
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:3
Main span:1,057f
Side spans:2
Notes
Photo by David Denenberg Photo by Wayne Grodkiewicz Photo by Patrick S. O'Donnell Photo by David Denenberg Photo by David Denenberg
1867 Mosquito Road
Placerville, California, USA (South Fork American River)
Bridgemeister ID:2323
Use:Vehicular
Status:Replaced
Main cables:Wire
Notes
  • The February 23, 1995 edition of the Mountain Democrat (Placerville, California) has an article about the Mosquito crossing that mentions: "According to the El Dorado County History of 1883 by Paolo Sioli, 'Mosquito is connected to Placerville by a good wagon-road and a suspension bridge across the South Fork of the American River, a trail is running in the direction of Kelsey, the township center... The original bridge was constructed in 1867, and according to Orval Beckett, as quoted in the booklet, Mosquito Memories, 'This original bridge had no banisters on the sides. It was a suspension cable with No. 9 telephone wires strung between the supports. When you drove onto the bridge, it would 'swing and sway' much like we have seen in the movies. When one end went down the other went up, etc. Imagine the thrill!'"
  • Replaced by 1939 Mosquito Road - Placerville, California, USA.
1867 Public Garden
Boston, Massachusetts, USA (Public Garden lagoon)
Bridgemeister ID:245
Structurae ID:0008544
References:HBE
Principals:William Gibbons Preston, Clemens Herschel
Use:Footbridge
Status:In use (last checked, 2011)
Main cables:Eyebar (iron)
Suspended spans:3
Main span:1
Side spans:2
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg Photo by Wayne Grodkiewicz
1868 (suspension bridge)
Afton, New York, USA (Susquehanna River)
Bridgemeister ID:66
Principals:G. W. & J. V. V. Fishler, James Crowell
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:362f
Deck width:16f
Postcard, collection of David Denenberg
1868 Calloway's Ford (Whitewater, Harrison's)
Elizabethtown vicinity, Hamilton County, Ohio, USA (Whitewater River)
Bridgemeister ID:68
References:EOV
Principals:John Gray, Morse, Young
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed, 1920
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Main span:475f
Deck width:22f
Notes
  • This bridge was located where present-day Suspension Bridge Road crosses the Whitewater River next to I-275 and north of US50. According to information provided by Sharon Lutz from Marjorie Byrnside Burress, this bridge was renamed "Harrison's Suspension Bridge" in 1891. This should not be confused with the nearby suspension bridge at Harrison.
  • According to the information provided by Sharon Lutz from Marjorie Byrnside Burress, "Crossing this bridge was the main thoroughfare from Indiana into Ohio for many years (US 50 was not completed by then). [In 1920] it was decided that the Suspension Bridge had become obsolete and could no longer safely withstand the weight of vehicles. [On May 19, 1920] the cables were severed by means of an oxygen flame, the weight of the cables pulled down some towers. Other towers were weakened by dynamite at their bases and later they were pulled down by the weight of the cables severed at one end with an oxygen flame."
  • See 1873 Harrison - Harrison, Ohio and Dearborn County, Indiana, USA.
Postcard, collection of David Denenberg
1868 Carpenter's Point
Port Jervis, New Jersey, USA (Neversink River)
Bridgemeister ID:2251
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:Replaced, 1929
Main cables:Wire
Suspended spans:1
Notes
  • Was at location of current Tri-States Bridge.
1868 High Street (Hamilton)
Hamilton, Ohio, USA (Great Miami River)
Bridgemeister ID:67
References:EOV
Principals:John Gray
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire
Suspended spans:1
Notes
1868 Wire
New Portland, Maine, USA (Carrabasset River)
Bridgemeister ID:69
Structurae ID:0001115
O'Donnell ID:768
Coordinates:N 44.890783 W 70.0925
Maps:Acme, Google, MapQuest
References:BC3, BPL, GBD, LAB, RDH
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:In use (last checked, 2004)
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:198.4f
Notes
  • BPL says c. 1866. Historic landmark plaque at bridge also says 1866.
  • Extensive repairs, 1960.
Photo by David Denenberg
1869 (footbridge)
Salado, Texas, USA (Salado Creek - Salado College)
Bridgemeister ID:920
Use:Footbridge
Status:Destroyed, 1913
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Notes
  • Destroyed by flood, 1913.
1869 (footbridge)
Warren and Glade, Pennsylvania, USA (Conewango Creek - at Third Avenue)
Bridgemeister ID:1623
Use:Footbridge
Status:Replaced, 1904
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Notes
  • Destroyed by storm soon after completion and rebuilt.
  • Images of America: Warren by Jodi L. Brandon shows an image of this bridge with a caption stating the bridge was moved to Kelletville (in Forest County, Pennsylvania) in 1906.
1869 Clifton (Niagara-Clifton, Falls View, First Falls View)
Niagara Falls, New York, USA and Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada (Niagara River)
Bridgemeister ID:70
Structurae ID:0000528
References:AAJ, BPL, HBE, PTS2
Principals:Samuel Keefer
Use:Vehicular
Status:Replaced, 1889
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Main span:1,268.3f
Deck width:10f
Notes
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1869 Lordville
Lordville, New York and Equinunk, Pennsylvania, USA (Delaware River)
Bridgemeister ID:71
References:BDR, BOL, PTS2
Principals:E.F. Farrington
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:Destroyed, 1903
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Notes
Postcard, collection of David Denenberg
1869 Waco
Waco, Texas, USA (Brazos River)
Bridgemeister ID:72
Structurae ID:0001398
O'Donnell ID:928
References:AAJ, BC3, BPL, BRAZ, GBD, HAERTX98, HBE, PTS2, WSB
Principals:Thomas M. Griffith
Use:Vehicular (with walkway)
Status:In use, but restricted to foot traffic (last checked, 2014)
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:475f
Deck width:18f
Notes
  • Rebuilt 1915.
Photo by Carla Pendergraft
1870 (footbridge)
Rockford, Illinois, USA (Kent Creek - Tinker Swiss Cottage Museum)
Bridgemeister ID:594
Principals:Robert Tinker
Use:Footbridge
Status:Removed, 1976
Notes
1870 Big Flats
Big Flats, New York, USA
Bridgemeister ID:73
Status:Replaced, 1905
Main cables:Wire (iron)
1870 Chehocton
Hancock, New York and Wayne County, Pennsylvania, USA (Delaware River)
Bridgemeister ID:284
Principals:E.F. Farrington, John A. Roebling's Sons Co.
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed, 1937
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:~475f
Notes
  • Replaced 1937.
Postcard, collection of David Denenberg
1870 Pond Eddy-Lumberland (Decker's)
Pond Eddy and Lumberland, New York, USA (Delaware River)
Bridgemeister ID:297
References:BDR
Principals:James D. Decker
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:2
Main spans:2
Deck width:12f
1871 (suspension bridge)
Washburn's Eddy, New York, USA (Hudson River)
Bridgemeister ID:74
References:ABC
Principals:Robert Gilchrist
Status:Removed
Notes
1871 Ferry Street
Binghamton, New York, USA (Chenango River)
Bridgemeister ID:276
Principals:John A. Roebling's Sons, Co.
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:Removed, 1897
Main cables:Wire
Suspended spans:1
Main span:360f
Notes
  • This bridge was close to the alignment of Binghamton's present Clinton Street bridge. It replaced a bridge that was destroyed by flood in 1865. It was condemned in 1896 and removed in 1897. History Of Broome County indicates an act was passed March 13th, 1871 authorizing the bridge with the contract let to "W.A. Roebling & Son" each cable consisting of seven steel wire ropes, each two inches in diameter.
  • An article from the Binghamton Democrat, July 20, 1871: "The Suspension Bridge -- The work on the west abutment of the suspension bridge has been commenced and will be rapidly as advisable pushed forward to completion, and soon thereafter the wire cables will be placed in position, the stays, supports and girders made fast, and ready for the flooring. In the course of six or eight weeks it is hoped that the bridge will be completed, and our people given another way of passing from the 1st to the 2nd wards, and the old-pleasant driveway re-opened, of which we have been debarred since the flood of St-Patrick's Day in the morning in [1865]. Upon the completion of this enterprise, surely no one will ever regret having voted in favor of the free suspension bridge."
  • An article from the Binghamton Democrat, Nov. 30, 1871: "The New Bridge -- Its Cost -- For the suspenssion [sic] bridge, the tax-payers voted $28,000. It is finished, and in the Common Council last evening it was asserted that it cost over $30,000 and still all the claims are not satisfied. Mr. Jas. Fanning, contractor for building abutments, seeks relief for $1,000 or upwards which he is out no account of his contract. His petition was after considerable skirmishing finally referred to a committee. We hold that this is wrong, the Common Council has nothing to do with this matter. Mayor Dwight published a card binding himself to pay all over $28,000 that the bridge would cost. The people voted that amount and their representatives have nothing to do with any further cost or expense arrising [sic] from that source."
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1871 Warren (Hickory Street)
Warren, Pennsylvania, USA (Allegheny River)
Bridgemeister ID:75
References:AAJ, EOV, HAERPA461, HBE, PTS2
Principals:George W. Fishler
Use:Vehicular (with walkway)
Status:Replaced, 1918
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:1
Main span:470f
Deck width:29f
Postcard, collection of David Denenberg Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg
1872 Barrett
Port Jervis, New York and Matamoras, Pennsylvania, USA (Delaware River)
Bridgemeister ID:76
References:BDR
Use:Vehicular
Status:Destroyed, October 11, 1903
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Suspended spans:2
Main spans:2
Notes
  • BDR: Destroyed by ice March 17, 1875, rebuilt, destroyed by flood October 11, 1903.
Stereoview, collection of David Denenberg Postcard, collection of David Denenberg
1872 Branch Hill
Branch Hill and Symmes, Ohio, USA (Little Miami River)
Bridgemeister ID:77
References:EOV
Principals:John Gray
Use:Vehicular (one-lane)
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire
Notes
  • Based on correspondence between "Gray's firm" and Washington Roebling, EOV suggests there may be a chance this early bridge contained steel cables.
1872 Chemung
Chemung, New York, USA (Chemung River)
Bridgemeister ID:78
Principals:J.V. Fishler, J.R. Crowell
Use:Vehicular
Status:Removed
Main cables:Wire (iron)
Postcard, collection of David Denenberg

Do you have any information or photos for these bridges that you would like to share? Please email aspan@bridgemeister.com.

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